Aringo client accepted to Wharton with a $80,000 scholarship

Aringo client, GMAT score of 650, accepted to MIT!

Aringo's Chicago admission rate is 54% higher than Chicago’s regular admission rate.

Two Aringo clients accepted to Kellogg with $60,000 scholarships

Aringo client, GMAT score of 580, accepted to Harvard!

Aringo's Columbia admission rate is 50% higher than Columbia’s regular admission rate.

Aringo client accepted to Harvard with a $65,000 scholarship

Aringo client, GMAT score of 640, accepted to Wharton!

Aringo's Harvard admission rate is 45% higher than Harvard's regular admission rate.

Aringo client accepted to Chicago with a $140,000 scholarship

Aringo client, GMAT score of 670, accepted to Harvard!

Aringo's INSEAD admission rate is 106% higher than INSEAD's regular admission rate.

Three Aringo clients accepted to Chicago with scholarships of $130,000 each!

Aringo client, GMAT score of 630, accepted to INSEAD!

Aringo's Kellogg admission rate is 90% higher than Kellogg’s regular admission rate.

Two Aringo clients accepted to Chicago with scholarships of $110,000 each

Two Aringo clients, GMAT scores of 660, accepted to Harvard!

Aringo's LBS admission rate is 238% higher than LBS’s regular admission rate.

Two Aringo clients accepted to Chicago with scholarships of $125,000 each

Aringo client, GMAT score of 640, accepted to Kellogg!

Aringo's MIT admission rate is 123% higher than MIT’s regular admission rate.

Aringo client accepted to NYU with a $45,000 scholarship

Aringo client, GMAT score of 660, accepted to Wharton!

Aringo's Stanford admission rate is 114% higher than Stanford’s regular admission rate.

Four Aringo clients accepted to Stanford with scholarships of $20,000 each

Aringo client, GMAT score of 630, accepted to LBS!

Aringo's Wharton admission rate is 66% higher than Wharton’s regular admission rate.

Aringo client accepted to Darden with a $34,000 scholarship

Aringo client accepted to Columbia with a $30,000 scholarship

Aringo client, GMAT score of 640, accepted to Duke!

Aringo client has been offered a $40,000 scholarship to attend Tuck

Two Aringo clients, GMAT scores of 640 accepted to INSEAD!

Aringo client has been offered a $22,000 scholarship to attend Kellogg

Three Aringo clients, GMAT scores of 680 accepted to MIT!

Two Aringo clients have received $25,000 scholarships to attend Wharton

Aringo client, GMAT score of 600, accepted to Duke!

Two Aringo clients have been accepted to Stanford with scholarships of $30,000 each

Aringo client accepted to Wharton with a $50,000 scholarship

Aringo client accepted to UCLA with a $35,000 scholarship

Five Aringo clients accepted to Michigan with a $20,000 scholarship each

 

Tips from MIT Admissions Director


In an Aringo consultants' conversation with the MIT Sloan Director of Admissions, Rod Garcia, Mr. Garcia provided a few interesting tips for the application process:

* The school looks for diversity. “Engineers, non-profits, entertainment, banking, finance. I'll caution you on focusing only on ‘fitting in.’ We get a lot of people who look the same. The challenge is to distinguish yourself.” Specific attributes they look for include the ability to build long-term business relationships, drive and ambition, and the ability to set goals and achieve them.

* In addition, Sloan is open to career-changers and encourages applicants to maintain an open mind about their futures and use their business school experience to explore new options.

* Mr. Garcia advises applicants to visit the campus if possible. The applicants can then show how they feel about the place, and perhaps relate to some aspects of the school personally.

* Regarding the unique element of the MIT application - the cover letter, Mr. Garcia explained that this requirement is intended to check the quality of the applicant’s business-style writing. This can be especially important for applicants who are engineers - to demonstrate their familiarity and experience with the business world.

* Mr. Garcia advises applicants not to come to the interview over-prepared. Maintain some spontaneity to show the interviewer who you really are.